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It Burst Into A Flame

Erica. 21 years. South Florida. African American. Queer. Music Addict. Art Enthusiast. Book Collector. Aries.
Mar 14 '14
iridessence:

astrodidact:

People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 
8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates
Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.
When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.
After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.
Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.
Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.
http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/


;~; little babies changing the world

iridessence:

astrodidact:

People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 

8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates

Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.

When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.

After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.

Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.

Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.

http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/

;~; little babies changing the world

Mar 10 '14

helladutchess asked:

r u single?

dennys:

we are a restaurant 

Mar 10 '14

hippiebabysitterr:

today i heard 2 kids talking about buying fake IDs after school and so i started eavesdropping cuz u know thats big kid stuff and then one was like “yeah but is all this really worth it like im pretty sure the fake IDs cost more than the fish we r gonna buy”

to buy fish at petco u have to be 18 or older

they were going to get fakes to buy fish

Mar 10 '14

tinalikesbutts:

Okay never say that period pains aren’t that bad because one time I had an ovarian cyst that burst before they found it, and when the doctor saw how big it was, he asked me, “How were you not screaming in pain?”

And my response was, “Oh, I thought they were just cramps.”

Feb 28 '14
stiltsforshorttempers:

grrlyman:

tashabilities:

missgingerlee:

damnitdisney:

sexidance:

capitalized:

Can’t believe she had to openly talk about this all the time. No wonder she’s fucked up.

 i’m telling you guys… read that rolling stone article “the tragedy of britney spears”

“…she is intelligent enough to understand what the world wanted of her: that she was created as a virgin to be deflowered before us, for our amusement and titillation. She is not ashamed of her new persona — she wants us to know what we did to her.”


IMPORTANT.

The bolded part. Oh my god the bolded part. 

Microexpressions.
That smile is an angry smile.

Did not imagine my day would begin with me crying over Brittany Spears.

Britney Spears is important to me.

stiltsforshorttempers:

grrlyman:

tashabilities:

missgingerlee:

damnitdisney:

sexidance:

capitalized:

Can’t believe she had to openly talk about this all the time. No wonder she’s fucked up.

 i’m telling you guys… read that rolling stone article “the tragedy of britney spears”

“…she is intelligent enough to understand what the world wanted of her: that she was created as a virgin to be deflowered before us, for our amusement and titillation. She is not ashamed of her new persona — she wants us to know what we did to her.”

IMPORTANT.

The bolded part. Oh my god the bolded part. 

Microexpressions.

That smile is an angry smile.

Did not imagine my day would begin with me crying over Brittany Spears.

Britney Spears is important to me.

(Source: kathybethterry)

Feb 28 '14

matesprit:

vine trends that need to stop:

  • screaming in public places
  • white people saying nigga
  • scaring/hurting animals
  • making people uncomfortable on purpose to try and be awkward
  • harassing the homeless
Feb 28 '14

streetfoodandfashion:

iamcamdon:

speckster:

reptilereasons:

this period of the simpsons where homer is pretty clueless but still tries hard to be a good father because he does love his kids is my favourite, so many feelings

image

GROSS SOBBING

Something I really really liked about a few of the Homer/Lisa episodes in the earlier seasons of the show was how it paints a really sweet yet unconventional father/daughter relationship, basically in the way that Homer is a parental force to Lisa, so too is Lisa a parental force to Homer. 

It’s really highlighted in one particular scene in the “future” episode “Lisa’s Wedding”, where Homer has a nice conversation with her just before her wedding.

Homer: Little Lisa, Lisa Simpson.  You know, I always felt you were the best thing my name ever got attached to. Since the time you learned to pin your own diapers, you've been smarter than me.
 Lisa: Oh, Dad --
Homer: No, no, let me finish.  I just want you to know I've always been proud of you.  You're my greatest accomplishment and you did it all yourself.  You helped me understand my own wife better and taught me to be a better person, but you're also my daughter, and I don't think anybody could have had a better daughter than you--
 Lisa: Dad, you're babbling.
Homer: See?  You're still helping me.


*Uncontrollable sobbing*
It’s so beautiful

(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours)

Feb 28 '14
unimpressedcats:

Dahlia reflects the soulless nature of the camera lens

unimpressedcats:

Dahlia reflects the soulless nature of the camera lens

Feb 25 '14
"One of the greatest tragedies in life is to lose your own sense of self and accept the version of you that is expected by everyone else."
K.L. Toth (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
Feb 9 '14
petticoatruler:

bana05:


Rutina Wesley looking at Gina Torres the way we all feel about Gina Torres.

You can see the stars in her eyes. That is the only way to gaze upon Gina Torres.

If this was a gif you would be able to see the sparkles

petticoatruler:

bana05:

Rutina Wesley looking at Gina Torres the way we all feel about Gina Torres.

You can see the stars in her eyes. That is the only way to gaze upon Gina Torres.

If this was a gif you would be able to see the sparkles

(Source: idontlikeyourturtlepuppet)

Feb 9 '14
randomsociopath:

hauntedmarch:

ryanstylish:

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez Correa went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and with in the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We going to follow with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Thats a horrible title. Steve jobs was a self centered, credit stealing, asshat. She is hopefully the next Gates or Wozniak, 

^^^^^^^^

This should be on every newpapers , every single new show, here in Mexico. 
I know we are dealing with some grousome stuff right now with narco wars, but this… This show us that we are doing sth right, that we need the support of our goverment to create better systems of education for our kids.

randomsociopath:

hauntedmarch:

ryanstylish:

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez Correa went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and with in the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We going to follow with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Thats a horrible title. Steve jobs was a self centered, credit stealing, asshat. She is hopefully the next Gates or Wozniak, 

^^^^^^^^

This should be on every newpapers , every single new show, here in Mexico. 

I know we are dealing with some grousome stuff right now with narco wars, but this… This show us that we are doing sth right, that we need the support of our goverment to create better systems of education for our kids.

Feb 9 '14

marquimode:

I realize after looking at this photos that I appear way more masculine than I really am (I’m literally a teddy bear princess). Whatever, I still look cute :]

anygay, it’s fatshion february so you should maybe check that out because theres a lot of great well dressed babes. 

It’s nothing spectacular but I still like to share my looks with you guys :]

Jacket: Levi’s
Shirt: Liz Claiborne.
Pants: Karen K.
Shoes: Steve Madden
Handbag: Steve Madden


Also Also Also,
MY BEARD HAS GOTTEN SO HUGE!!!!!!! IT’S RIDICULOUS! 

Feb 8 '14

warminvention:

Fade into you
Strange you never knew
Fade into you
I think it’s strange you never knew

Hope + crimpers ❤❤❤❤❤❤

(Source: just-like-h0ney)

Feb 8 '14
barefooteconomist:

brooklynboobala:

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

This made me cry because humanity.

"You can’t go that way, its toward the road."

barefooteconomist:

brooklynboobala:

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

This made me cry because humanity.

"You can’t go that way, its toward the road."

Feb 8 '14

soullesshusk:

theomeganerd:

Video Game Themed Lunches 

Via Imgur

ERIC LOOK AT THESE
i KNOW HOW MUCH YOU LOVE BENTO